Brad Pitt Wins Best Supporting Actor Oscar

Brad Pitt Wins Best Supporting Actor Oscar
It’s Pitt’s first Academy Award in an acting category. He previously won as producer of “12 Years a Slave.”

Brad Pitt has won the Best Supporting Actor Academy Award for his performance as stunt double Cliff Booth in Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.”

In a fairly competitive category, Pitt beat out fellow nominees Tom Hanks (Fred Rogers in “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”), Anthony Hopkins (Pope Benedict XVI in “The Two Popes”), Al Pacino (Jimmy Hoffa in “The Irishman”), and Joe Pesci (Russell Bufalino in “The Irishman”).

This is Pitt’s fourth nomination as an actor, and his first acting Oscar win. Previously, he was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1996 for “12 Monkeys,” for Best Actor in 2009 for “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” for Best Actor in 2012 for “Moneyball.”

As a producer, he has three Best Picture nominations: “Moneyball” (2012), “12 Years a Slave” (2014), and “The Big Short” (2016). He won for “12 Years a Slave,” which was his first ever Oscar win.

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BAFTA Winner Brad Pitt Jokes About Being Single & Prince Harry, Margot Robbie Reads His Speech

Brad Pitt poked fun at his own dating life and the U.K.’s decision to leave the European Union.

Brad Pitt won big at the British Academy Film and Television Arts Awards, but the actor wasn’t at the award show to pick up his award.

Shortly before the London awards show was scheduled to begin, it was revealed that Pitt, who was nominated for best supporting actor for his role in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, would not be attending the show, as had been expected.

Though Pitt, 56, was not physically at the award show, he did get a chance to show off his sense of humor as costar Margot Robbie accepted the award on his behalf and read his speech on stage.

“Brad couldn’t be here tonight due to family obligations, so he asked me to read his response for him,” Robbie said.

“He starts by saying, ‘Hey Britain. Heard you just became single. Welcome to the club!’ ” the actress said while reading Pitt’s jokes in his speech, which poked fun at his own dating life and the U.K.’s decision to leave the European Union became official this week.

“He then says, ‘Thank you to the Academy for this extreme honor.’ He says he’s ‘always been a bit intimidated over here given the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts and the titans that have come before, so this is especially meaningful,’ ” Robbie continued.

Pitt’s acceptance speech also had a joke about another high-profile exit: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s decision to step back from royal life.

The actor joked he would be calling his award Harry because he was looking forward “to taking it back to America.”

A rep for Pitt did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

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Sundance 2020: Lee Isaac Chung’s ‘Minari’ is another winner from A24

So much of the Sundance hype train these days revolves around whatever indie production company/distributor A24 brings to the festival or acquires in Park City each year, and it seemed that the press quickly made up their mind about which of their two offerings they were going to run with this year. That film was Zola, which had all the makings of a buzz-worthy and attention-grabbing premiere here thanks to its relatively unique premise — it’s the first movie based off of a series of tweets! — and, sadly, I won’t have a chance to see it while I’m here. On the other hand, A24’s other festival offering, Lee Isaac Chung’s Minari, co-produced with Brad Pitt’s Plan B, is being left to rest on its massive bonafides, surprising audiences (including myself) with its warmth and heart. You’ll want to keep your eyes and ears open for any word on when this one will come out, because it is just lovely.

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‘Once Upon a Time’ costumes shun the 1960s stereotypes and find the characters

Quentin Tarantino’s ninth film, “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood,” is set in 1969 Los Angeles at the end of Hollywood’s Golden Age. It showcases Oscar-nominated costume designer Arianne Phillips’ divine array of looks for historical and fictional characters alike.

Phillips suspects her somewhat nonlinear career (she’s worked with Madonna for 22 years across many mediums and has been a fashion editor and theater costume designer) meant she was up for the challenge of bringing Tarantino’s film to sartorial life.

“It was a real camaraderie I’d never really experienced on that level,” Phillips says. “It was every fantasy I could ever have in terms of a film about Hollywood and being part of a contemporary Hollywood history.”

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James Gray On ‘Ad Astra’

James Gray first met his Ad Astra star Brad Pitt at the Sundance Film Festival in 1995. His debut feature, Little Odessa, had played there on a road that started at the Venice Film Festival in 1994, and Pitt responded instantly to it, setting up a meeting with Gray that, while it took more than 20 years to bear collaborative fruit, nevertheless resulted in a friendship that endures to this day.

Pitt plays Major Roy McBride, whose dreams of the stars come from the legendary astronaut his father (Tommy Lee Jones) represented. Missing in space since Roy was 16, and presumed dead, Roy receives word that, in fact, his father might be alive, and responsible for energy attacks that are crippling Earth’s infrastructure. He must journey through the solar system to learn the truth.

The movie was coming together as Gray was working to finish The Lost City Of Z, his previous film, which marked his first collaboration with Pitt, who produced it through his company Plan B. It was during the editing process on The Lost City Of Z, Gray says, speaking shortly before the Venice premiere of Ad Astra, that he and Pitt started to discuss a reteaming that would cast Pitt as the star of one of Gray’s movies for the first time.

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