September 22, 2019



• x019 Photoshoots
• x012 Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (Stills & Promotional Photoshoots)
• x020 Television (The Today Show, Ellen, Good Morning America & Jimmy Kimmel)
• x010 Magazines (Covers 2019)
• x018 Ad Astra (Behind the Scenes, Promo & Stills)
• x006 September 16 – Space Operations Center at NASA Headquarters – Washington, WA
• x007 September 16 – NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

PS. He sure has been busy and with that – keeping me and other BP fansites busy. But I am enjoying these updates. More soon!

September 21, 2019
by admin / Ad Astra BP Media

Brad Pitt sat down with Cathy Kelley to talk about his new film, “Ad Astra,” and revealed whether or not he’d be up for stepping into the ring at a WWE event. – September 20, 2019

September 21, 2019
by admin / Ad Astra BP Media

Actor Brad Pitt, who plays an astronaut in his latest film, “Ad Astra,” joins NASA to kick off a new series where NASA experts take your questions. Tune in for our full episode with Brad Pitt on Friday, Sept. 20, and more episodes with our subject matter experts starting Monday, Sept. 23. – September 19, 2019

What questions would you ask NASA? Actor Brad Pitt, who plays an astronaut in his new movie Ad Astra, helps us kick off our new #AskNASA YouTube series with a few questions about space exploration. What did you learn from watching astronauts on the International Space Station? Would you rather visit the Moon or Mars? – September 20, 2019

September 21, 2019
by admin / Ad Astra

When Brad Pitt is on a panel with NASA officials, he’s the one with the questions.

“If we were going to make a trip to Mars, we would have to take off from the moon, because of the lack of gravity?” he hesitantly asked spacesuit engineer Lindsay Aitchison Monday afternoon, as part of a Washington Post Live event centered on Pitt’s latest film, “Ad Astra.” Joining them were the writer-director, James Gray; lunar scientist Sarah Noble; and panel moderator Ann Hornaday, chief film critic at The Post.

Aitchison’s affirmative response (“It’s helpful”), coupled with a distilled scientific explanation, was characteristic of much of her and Noble’s responses to Pitt’s earnest questions. He was soon outdone by an inquisitive Gray, who explained his granular knowledge of Neil Armstrong’s talk-show appearances by joking, “I don’t get out much.”

Gray’s commitment to portraying space with accuracy over allure is obvious throughout “Ad Astra.” The sci-fi thriller, set for a Friday release, takes place in the near future and centers on Maj. Roy McBride (Pitt), a skilled but emotionally worn astronaut recruited to determine and shut down the source of unbridled energy causing destructive power surges throughout the solar system. The source is believed to be near Neptune, which also happens to be the last known location of the Lima Project, a decades-old effort to discover extraterrestrial life commandeered by Roy’s father (Tommy Lee Jones).

Roy had long presumed his father to be dead, and the revelation that he might not be — and that the Lima Project might be causing the surges — leads Roy to embark on two journeys: the literal one to Neptune, and an equally harrowing exploration of solitude.

Read more.

September 21, 2019
by admin / Ad Astra BP Media

September 16, 2019
by admin / Ad Astra

“I’m sorry to get sententious on you,” James Gray says around the midpoint of our interview. The director of “Ad Astra” is apologizing for keeping things highbrow, which is no reason to apologize at all.

Gray has been arguing astronauts are bad at talking about the wonders of space travel. His theory is that art gets the metaphysics of space in a way that many who’ve been there cannot express. He’s moved through a decent Neil Armstrong impression, “The Empire Strikes Back” and Vermeer, and now he’d like to stir Japanese printmaker Hokusai into the mix. Gray paraphrases a quote from the artist, about art and age’s ability to distill the vast scope of life with simple expressions, steering himself back on course.

Talking with the director it’s clear each answer starts with its destination way out of sight. Some tie off neatly, others trail off in a semi-rhetorical “Am I making any sense?” Either way, it’s a journey packed with big ideas and lashings of introspection.

Anyone who has watched a Gray movie, which he writes or co-writes as well as directs, will know this extends to his filmmaking. It’s why the American has become known as a director’s director; one who attracts big-name actors looking to him to coax out career-best performances.

Gray’s last movie, 2016’s “The Lost City of Z,” was a reflective character study that sent real-life British explorer Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam) into deepest Amazonia on a quest which consumed body and soul. Now he has returned to fire Brad Pitt into the cosmos on much the same trajectory.

“Ad Astra,” Gray’s seventh feature, sees the director handed a significantly larger budget than usual to realize his ambitious near-future sci-fi thriller. Pitt, Gray’s friend and producing partner, leads as Roy McBride, an astronaut following in the footsteps of his missing-presumed-dead father (Tommy Lee Jones). After a burst of cosmic rays from deep space threatens life on Earth, Roy must venture to the outer reaches of the solar system to find the source, where clues about his father’s disappearance may also lie.

Read more.

September 16, 2019
by admin / Ad Astra

Brad Pitt stars in upcoming science fiction film “Ad Astra” about an astronaut’s journey throughout the solar system to find his missing father.

Now the actor is getting the chance to talk to someone with real-life experience in space.

Pitt had a conversation about life in space with Nick Hague, who has been an astronaut since 2013 and is currently part of the Expedition 59 and 60 crew on the International Space Station.

On the video call, the two discussed everything from Hague’s day-to-day life to his relationship with NASA’s team on the ground to what the astronaut thought of “Ad Astra.”

Read more.

September 15, 2019
by admin / Ad Astra Alerts

As NASA prepares to send the first woman and next man to the Moon by 2024 under the Artemis program, Brad Pitt is playing an astronaut in his latest film. Now the actor will have the opportunity to discuss what it’s truly like to live and work in space with a NASA crew member living aboard the International Space Station.

Pitt’s Earth-to-space call will air live at 11:35 a.m. EDT Monday, Sept. 16 on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

NASA astronaut Nick Hague will answer questions from the actor. For nearly 20 years, astronauts have continuously lived and work on the International Space Station, testing technologies, performing science and developing the skills needed to explore farther from Earth.

Read more.

September 9, 2019
by admin / Ad Astra

September 4, 2019
by admin / Ad Astra

VENICE, Italy, Aug 29 (Reuters) – Brad Pitt has fought in wars, pulled off robbery heists and confronted rivals in the boxing ring during his career, but the Hollywood star says his most challenging film yet is playing an astronaut on a life-saving mission in the space epic “Ad Astra”.

The 55-year-old actor takes audiences to the far reaches of the solar system in his role as Roy McBride after a new threat causing disastrous power surges threatens Earth.

McBride sets off to find his pioneering astronaut father, played by Tommy Lee Jones, who went missing more than a decade earlier while on a mission to Neptune.

Set in the near future when mankind has set up living stations and research centres on the moon and Mars, McBride makes his way into the vast abyss journeying through spectacular landscapes and empty space.

The trip soon becomes a journey of self-discovery.

“This has been the most challenging film I have ever worked on,” Pitt, also a producer on the movie, told a news conference at the Venice Film Festival, where “Ad Astra” premieres on Thursday.

“The story … is so delicate and any clip of a frame too early or music cue or voiceover could easily tip the thing over or be too much or be too obvious. It was a constant effort just to try to maintain this balance and try to keep this story unfolding in a very subtle and delicate way.”

Read more.