September 5, 2012
by admin /

2011

Character: Billy Beane
Release Date: 19 December 2011
Directed By: Bennett Miller
Written By: Steven Zaillian, Aaron Sorkin, Stan Chervin, Michael Lewis
Genre: Biography/Drama/Sport
Tagline: What are you really worth?
MPAA Rating: Rated PG-13
Produced by: Columbia Pictures, Scott Rudin Productions, Michael De Luca Productions
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Budget: $50,000,000 (estimated)
Filming Dates: 12 July 2010 – ?

Cast:
Brad Pitt…- Billy Beane
Jonah Hill…- Peter Brand
Philip Seymour Hoffman…- Art Howe
Robin Wright…- Sharon
Chris Pratt…- Scott Hatteberg
Stephen Bishop…- David Justice
Reed Diamond…- Mark Shapiro
Brent Jennings…- Ron Washington

Filming Locations:
Blair Field, Recreation Park – 4700 E. 10th Street, Long Beach, California, USA
(exterior scenes)
Downtown, Los Angeles, California, USA
Fenway Park – 4 Yawkey Way, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Oakland, California, USA (Oakland Athletics Stadium)

Synopsis:
Oakland A’s GM Billy Beane is handicapped with the lowest salary constraint in baseball. If he ever wants to win the World Series, Billy must find a competitive advantage. Billy is about to turn baseball on its ear when he uses statistical data to analyze and place value on the players he picks for the team.

Trivia & Facts:
When Steven Soderbergh was still supposed to direct, he cast Brad Pitt and Demetri Martin in the lead roles and had already shot interview scenes with baseball players Lenny Dykstra, Mookie Wilson and Darryl Strawberry to be included in the film.

During pre-production, director of photography Adam Kimmel was arrested in Connecticut on sexual assault and weapons and explosives possession charges. He was replaced by Wally Pfister.

Production of the movie was set to begin on June 22, 2009, but it was surprisingly dropped by Columbia Pictures. Studio co-chairman Amy Pascal axed the movie after objecting to changes which original director Steven Soderbergh made to Steven Zaillian’s script.

Bobby Kotick, President, CEO and a director of Activision Blizzard portrays Stephen Schott, the owner of the Oakland Athletics in the film.

At one point, we hear that Miguel Tejada has struck out to end a game. In the original book, Tejada’s free swinging ways and relatively high strikeout rate was something of a point of contention, with the Dominican shortstop telling Beane and other Athletics’ members that “You can’t walk your way off the island”.

Several of the actors playing the ballplayers have baseball experience. Casey Bond spent time in the Giants’ organization, Stephen Bishop played for three years during the ’90s (including one season where he played with David Justice, who he portrays in the film), Royce Clayton played 17 years in MLB and Derrin Ebert played five games for the Braves in 1999.

Of all the Oakland players from the season represented in the movie (2002), only one played for Oakland in the season that the movie premiered (2011): Mark Ellis (and he was traded away in the middle of the season).

Despite suggestions in the movie that Hatteberg was a bad-fielding first baseman, he ended the year with a fielding percentage (.994) higher than the league average for his position (.993).

Bill James, noted as the statistical influence for the main characters’ analysis, is regarded by many to be the father of sabermetrics. This study of advanced baseball statistics is named after the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), an organization to which James and other sabermetrics pioneers belong. The film puts a heavy emphasis upon on-base percentage (OBP), though concepts like on-base-plus slugging-percentage (OPS), now a widely-accepted measure of a player’s hitting ability, are not mentioned. Concepts like runs created (RBIs plus runs scored), ERA+ and others widely used by statisticians are also not mentioned, perhaps owing to their increased acceptance in the years since the events portrayed in the film.

Bennett Miller told a screening audience that A’s assistant GM Paul DePodesta did not wish to have his real name used in the movie, but was very generously helpful during its making. While the filmmakers had no obligation to change his character’s name (to Peter Brand), they did so willingly.

David Justice is played by Stephen Bishop, a former pro baseball player. Bishop was a career Minor Leaguer, and as a Braves prospect was nicknamed Young Justice due to his
physical resemblance and similar playing style to David Justice.

The Oakland A’s set the new American League record for consecutive wins, with 20. The all-time Major League record is 26, set by the New York Giants in 1916, including one tie. Without ties, the record belongs to the 1935 Chicago Cubs (21 straight wins).

Notable film maker Spike Jonze makes a guest appearance starring as Alán, the socially awkward partner to Billy Beane’s (Brad Pitt’s) ex-wife in the film.

Several of the Oakland A’s radio announcers are heard throughout the movie, but are not credited: The legendary Bill King — who’s signature line “HOLY TOLEDO” punctuates the Royals rally to tie the A’s from an 11-0 start during what would become the 20th win in a row — is foremost among them. At various points from the 1950s until his death a few years ago, King called Oakland Raiders, Golden State Warriors, A’s and early on San Francisco Giants games. Also heard are Ken Korach, then King’s second fiddle who later took over the #1 play-by-play role, and color man Ray Fosse, a veteran of the 1970s Oakland championship teams who continued to call games for the A’s through the 2011 season.

All but one of the scouts in the movie were played by actual Major League Baseball scouts. Tom Gamboa, who played “Scout Martinez”, is perhaps best known as the Kansas City Royals first base coach who was attacked on the field by two fans during a game against the Chicago White Sox on September 19, 2002. The father and son, highly intoxicated, ran onto the field unprovoked, tackled Gamboa, and threw several punches before being restrained by players and security. As a result of the attack, Gamboa ultimately suffered permanent hearing loss.

According to the screenplay, “Against the Wind” by Bob Seger was the song to be played during the last scene in lieu of “The Show” by Lenka.

Billy Beane is portrayed as a lonely divorcée in the film, though in real life he had actually remarried. Scenes were actually shot with Kathryn Morris as his second wife, Tara, that didn’t make the final cut. However, Brad Pitt’s character still wears a wedding ring throughout the film.

First baseball movie to be nominated for the Best Picture Academy Award (Oscar) since Field of Dreams twenty-two years earlier.

Brad Pitt appeared in two movies that were both nominated for the Best Picture Academy Award (Oscar) in 2012. Pitt starred in both this movie and The Tree of Life.

Billy refers to John Poloni as “Rocco”. This is a reference to Jack McGee’s father who played minor league baseball and whose nickname was “Rocco”.

During the course of the film’s theatrical release, Ron Washington, an Oakland Athletics Coach seen in the movie, was Managing in the World Series for the Texas Rangers.

From the gallery

Quotes
Billy Beane: Would you rather get one shot in the head or five in the chest and bleed to death?
Peter Brand: Are those my only two options?

Billy Beane: I pay you to get on first, not get thrown out at second.

Scott Hatteberg: [Responding to being asked to play first base for the Oakland A’s] I’ve only ever
played catcher.
Billy Beane: It’s not that hard, Scott. Tell him, Wash.
Ron Washington: It’s incredibly hard.

Miguel Tejada: [Justice tries to get a soda out of a soda machine, nothing comes out] That costs a dollar, man.
David Justice: What?
Miguel Tejada: Welcome to Oakland, D.J.

Billy Beane: You think losing is fun?

Billy Beane: How can you not get romantic about baseball?

Peter Brand: Billy, this is Chad Bradford. He’s a relief pitcher. He is one of the most undervalued players in baseball. His defect is that he throws funny. Nobody in the big leagues cares about him because he looks funny. This guy could be not just the best pitcher in our bullpen, but one of the most effective relief pitchers in all of baseball. This guy should cost $3 million a year. We can get him for $237,000.

[Billy’s scouts are dismissive of Scott Hatteberg because he walks a lot]
Billy Beane: He gets on base a lot. Do I care if it’s a walk or a hit?

[after an argument about Billy’s statistical approach to baseball instead of trusting his scouts]
Billy Beane: I’m not gonna fire you, Grady.
Grady Fuson: Fuck you, Billy.
Billy Beane: Now I will.

Peter Brand: I wanted you to see these player evaluations that you asked me to do.
Billy Beane: I asked you to do three.
Peter Brand: Yeah.
Billy Beane: To evaluate three players.
Peter Brand: Yeah.
Billy Beane: How many you’d do?
Peter Brand: Forty-seven.
Billy Beane: Okay.
Peter Brand: Actually, fifty-one. I don’t know why I lied just then.

Billy Beane: [approaching Brand after a meeting with the Cleveland Indians] Hey.
Peter Brand: Hello.
Billy Beane: Who are you?
Peter Brand: I’m Peter Brand.
Billy Beane: What do you do?
Peter Brand: I’m special assistant to Mark Shapiro.
Billy Beane: So, what do you do?
Peter Brand: Mostly player analysis right now.
Billy Beane: Been on the job long? First job in baseball?
Peter Brand: It’s my first job anywhere.
Billy Beane: Wow, congrats.
Peter Brand: Thanks.
Billy Beane: First job. Whose nephew are you? Why does Mark listen to you?
Peter Brand: [stammering] I don’t think, uh… I don’t think he does very often.
Billy Beane: He just did.
Peter Brand: Well, in that circumstance, I think he was more listening to Bruce than myself.
Billy Beane: Mm-hmm. Who are you?
Peter Brand: I’m Peter Brand.
Billy Beane: I don’t give a rat’s ass what your name is. What happened in there? What happened in that room?
Peter Brand: I’m not quite sure what you’re asking me, Mr. Beane.
Billy Beane: What did you tell Bruce?
Peter Brand: I just told Bruce I like Garcia.
Billy Beane: You like Garcia. Why? Why?
Peter Brand: [looking around nervously] I don’t know.

Peter Brand: There is an epidemic failure within the game to understand what is really happening. And this leads people who run Major League Baseball teams to misjudge their players and mismanage their teams. I apologize.
Billy Beane: Go on.
Peter Brand: Okay. People who run ball clubs, they think in terms of buying players. Your goal shouldn’t be to buy players, your goal should be to buy wins. And in order to buy wins, you need to buy runs. You’re trying to replace Johnny Damon. The Boston Red Sox see Johnny Damon and they see a star who’s worth seven and half million dollars a year. When I see Johnny Damon, what I see is… is… an imperfect understanding of where runs come from. The guy’s got a great glove. He’s a decent leadoff hitter. He can steal bases. But is he worth the seven and half million dollars a year that the Boston Red Sox are paying him? No. No. Baseball thinking is medieval. They are asking all the wrong questions. And if I say it to anybody, I’m-I’m ostracized. I’m-I’m-I’m a leper. So that’s why I’m-I’m cagey about this with you. That’s why I… I respect you, Mr. Beane, and if you want full disclosure, I think it’s a good thing that you got Damon off your payroll. I think it opens up all kinds of interesting possibilities.

Billy Beane: You get on base, we win. You don’t, we lose. And I *hate* losing, Chavy. I *hate* it. I hate losing more than I even wanna win.

Billy Beane: You’re doing it again.
Casey Beane: What?
Billy Beane: You’re worrying about me.
Casey Beane: You’re in last place dad.
Billy Beane: Do I look worried?
Casey Beane: Yeah.
Billy Beane: Cause you’re getting on an airplane. Those things crash all the time. Please stop worrying about your dad.

Billy Beane: I want Dye in right, Justice DHing, Peña on the bench, Hatteberg at first, and anyone but Mags first out of the pen.
Art Howe: You want Peña on the bench?
Billy Beane: That’s right. So you can play Hatty.
Art Howe: Peña is not only the best first baseman on the roster, he’s the only first baseman on the
roster.
Billy Beane: Listen to me, Hatty gets on base more than Peña. In fact, twenty percent more.
Art Howe: And his fielding?
Billy Beane: His fielding does not matter.
Art Howe: I’ve heard enough of this.
Billy Beane: Have you?
Art Howe: And I, uh… I disagree with you, plain and simple. And moreover, I’m playing my team in a way that I can explain in job interviews next winter.

Billy Beane: Art, you got a minute?
Art Howe: Yeah. Take a seat.
Billy Beane: You can’t start Peña at first tonight. You’ll have to start Hatteberg.
Art Howe: Yeah, I don’t want to go fifteen rounds, Billy. The lineup card is mine, and that’s all.
Billy Beane: That lineup card is definitely yours. I’m just saying you can’t start Peña at first.
Billy Beane: Well, I am starting him at first.
Billy Beane: I don’t think so. He plays for Detroit now.
Art Howe: You *traded* Peña?
Billy Beane: Yeah. And Menechino, Hiljus, Tam are all being sent down.
Art Howe: You are outside your mind.
Billy Beane: Yeah. Cuckoo.
Jeremy Giambi: [knocking on door] You wanted to see me?
Billy Beane: Yeah, Jeremy, grab a seat.
[Jeremy sits down]
Billy Beane: Jeremy, you’ve been traded to the Phillies. This is Ed Wade’s number. He’s a good guy, he’s the GM. He’s expecting your call. Buddy will help you with the plane flight. You’re a good ballplayer, Jeremy, and we wish you the best.
[Jeremy sighs, and exits]
Billy Beane: Jeremy’s gone, too.
Art Howe: [shaking his head in disbelief] You’re killing this team.

Billy Beane: It’s hard not to be romantic about baseball. This kind of thing, it’s fun for the fans. It sells tickets and hot dogs. Doesn’t mean anything.
Peter Brand: Billy, we just won twenty games in a row.
Billy Beane: And what’s the point?
Peter Brand: We just got the record.
Billy Beane: Man, I’ve been doing this for… listen, man. I’ve been in this game a long time. I’m not in it for a record, I’ll tell you that. I’m not in it for a ring. That’s when people get hurt. If we don’t win the last game of the Series, they’ll dismiss us.
Peter Brand: Billy…
Billy Beane: I know these guys. I know the way they think, and they will erase us. And everything we’ve done here, none of it’ll matter. Any other team wins the World Series, good for them. They’re drinking champagne, they get a ring. But if we win, on our budget, with this team… we’ll have changed the game. And that’s what I want. I want it to mean something.

Billy Beane: [during a meeting with his scouts] If we try to play like the Yankees in here, we will lose to the Yankees out there.

Billy Beane: [having declined a $12.5 million offer to GM the Red Sox] I made one decision in my life based on money. And I swore I would never do it again.

Billy Beane: Guys, you’re just talking. Talking, “la-la-la-la”, like this is business as usual. It’s not.
Grady Fuson: We’re trying to solve the problem here, Billy.
Billy Beane: Not like this you’re not. You’re not even looking at the problem.
Grady Fuson: We’re very aware of the problem. I mean…
Billy Beane: Okay, good. What’s the problem?
Grady Fuson: Look, Billy, we all understand what the problem is. We have to…
Billy Beane: Okay, good. What’s the problem?
Grady Fuson: The problem is we have to replace three key players in our lineup.
Billy Beane: Nope. What’s the problem?
Pittaro: Same as it’s ever been. We’ve gotta replace these guys with what we have existing.
Billy Beane: Nope. What’s the problem, Barry?
Scout Barry: We need 38 home runs, 120 RBIs and 47 doubles to replace.
Billy Beane: Ehh!
[imitates buzzer]
Billy Beane: The problem we’re trying to solve is that there are rich teams and there are poor teams. Then there’s fifty feet of crap, and then there’s us. It’s an unfair game. And now we’ve been gutted. We’re like organ donors for the rich. Boston’s taken our kidneys, Yankees have taken our heart. And you guys just sit around talking the same old “good body” nonsense like we’re selling jeans. Like we’re looking for Fabio. We’ve got to think differently. We are the last dog at the bowl. You see what happens to the runt of the litter? He dies.

Billy Beane: [Suggesting a player for first base] Scott Hatteberg.
Scout Barry: Who?
Billy Beane: Exactly. The guy sounds like an Oakland A already.

Peter Brand: [Sleeping. His phone rings, waking him up] Hello?
Billy Beane: Pete? It’s Billy Beane.
Peter Brand: Wh-what time is it?
Billy Beane: I don’t know. Pete, would you have drafted me in the first round?
Peter Brand: What?
Billy Beane: After we talked, you looked me up. Would you have drafted me in the first round?
Peter Brand: Yeah, I did. You-you were pretty good.
Billy Beane: Cut the crap, Pete. Would you have drafted me in the first round?
Peter Brand: I would have picked you in the 9th round. No signing bonus. I think that would have convinced you to accept that scholarship.
Billy Beane: Pack your bags, Pete. I just bought you from the Cleveland Indians.

Billy Beane: Where you from, Pete?
Peter Brand: Maryland.
Billy Beane: Where’d you go to school?
Peter Brand: Yale. I went to Yale.
Billy Beane: What’d you study?
Peter Brand: Economics. I studied economics.
Billy Beane: Yale, economics, and baseball. You’re funny, Pete.

Billy Beane: When your enemy’s making mistakes, don’t interrupt him.

Billy Beane: If you lose the last game of the season, nobody gives a shit.

External Links
Official website
IMDB

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