May 25, 2019
by admin / Make It Right

A federal judge has sent the ongoing cluster of lawsuits surrounding Brad Pitt’s Make It Right development in New Orleans back to state court.

The ruling May 15 moved the lawsuits against three former officers of the Make It Right Foundation back to Orleans Parish Civil District Court, according to a court document. The former Make It Right officials are accused of building substandard houses.

In the years after Hurricane Katrina, Make It Right built 109 experimental modernist homes in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward to replace those lost to flooding. Spearheaded by actor Brad Pitt, the altruistic nonprofit enterprise sold the houses to former residents of the area at affordable prices. The rebuilt neighborhood became a post-K tourist attraction.

Brad Pitt’s Make It Right venture turns 10, triumphant but troubled

The daring post-K recovery project produced 109 homes in the Lower 9th Ward, including one that neighbors say has become an abandoned, moldy eyesore.

But on Sept. 7, 2018, roughly ten years after the project began, two Lower Ninth Ward residents sued Make It Right, accusing Pitt and several officers of the company of building houses that are flawed and deteriorating rapidly. As a proposed class action, the suit is intended to represent everyone who bought a Make it Right house.

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May 25, 2019

CANNES – Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon A Time In Hollywood” had a paparazzi-worthy reception last night with many highlighting it as his best film since “Kill Bill.” After a night of celebrating, Tarantino was joined by his stars Margot Robbie, Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt for the official Cannes press conference. And it’s not every day you have two of the world’s biggest movie stars sitting on a dais together.

“There were incredible ease and comfort getting to work alongside Brad,” DiCaprio says. “We kind of grew up in the generation, got our start around the same time. And, to be honest, Quentin gave us this incredible back story for our characters. He literally came to us with a bible of their work together, their friendship together, what they have been through the industry, how they are now on the outskirts in this new era of Hollywood. And all that sort of fed into this immediate comfort and ease that think he and I had with each other. I mean, look, Brad not only a terrific actor, but he’s also a professional. So, when Quentin puts you in these improvised scenarios and we both sort of have a great foothold on our history and our characters I have to say it was incredibly easy. Incredibly easy working with Brad and I think we forged a great cinematic bond in a film about our industry together.”

“I had a great laugh with him,” Pitt adds. “It’s that thing knowing you have the best of the best on the opposite side of the table holding up the scene with you. There is a great relief in that. As Leo said, We have the same reference points. We have been going through this at the same time. Similar experiences to laugh about it. I hope we do it again, it was great fun.”

May 25, 2019
by admin / BP Press

CANNES, France — On Tuesday, Quentin Tarantino returned with a bang and much critical love to the Cannes Film Festival with “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood,” his finest in years. A dream of a movie, it follows a handful of Hollywood types living in smoggy, starry Los Angeles in 1969, the year the Manson family went on a frenzied murder spree. Among the victims was the actress Sharon Tate, then married to Roman Polanski. In Tarantino’s Hollywoodland, Tate and Polanski live next door to Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio), a struggling, self-doubting TV actor. His best friend is Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt), a stuntman whose glory days are probably behind him. Rick could be another Clint Eastwood; Cliff should have been another Steve McQueen.

On Wednesday afternoon, I sat down for a brief chat with Pitt and DiCaprio in a suite at the Carlton Hotel, one of the grand hotels overlooking the Mediterranean. The two were in the midst of a massive publicity operation that day, giving interview after interview. Presenting a movie at Cannes can be big business and the army of Sony Pictures employees handling this offensive had the air of people worried about fumbling the most delicate of rarities. Their famous charges, by contrast, seemed wholly relaxed. Each man was affable, direct and seemed happy to talk, but, then, they have been in the business a long time. They know how to do this.

Read the interview.

May 25, 2019

Some quotes from the Cannes Once press conference:

Can you take stock on your life now and your life from the past?

BRAD PITT: I see Rick and Cliff as one individual. It really comes down to the acceptance of your life, your place, your surroundings, your challenges and troubles. In Rick we see someone who’s put upon in life. Life’s against him and they are some of the best breakdown scenes I’ve ever seen from my friend Leo here. In Cliff we see a character who accepts his lot in life and takes it as it comes.

Did you discuss with Polanski about dealing with tragedy in your film?

PITT: What the film so beautifully addresses is a loss of innocence. In 1969 when the Manson murders occurred there was this free love movement, a lot of hope and new ideas floating out there. Cinema was being recalibrated when that tragic loss of Sharon and the others happened. What scared people lasts so much today. It was a sobering look at the dark side of human nature.

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May 22, 2019


• x037 Once Upon a Time in Hollywood – Trailer 2 (Screencaps)
• x046 Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (premiere) – May 21 – Cannes, France

May 22, 2019

AP/Japan Times:
“Twenty-five years after premiering “Pulp Fiction” in Cannes, Quentin Tarantino returned to the French film festival with neither great vengeance nor furious anger but a gentler fairy tale about 1960s Los Angeles.”

Variety:
“Despite the ghoulish premise and sprawling canvas (no expense was spared in recreating Vietnam-era L.A.), the film is more of a character study than some of Tarantino’s recent works. It is, in some respects, a meditation on the ephemeral nature of talent and a cautionary tale for artists who find themselves out of step with the times. It’s unclear how commercial that will prove, something that could be worrisome for “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’s” backers, given the film’s hefty price tag. It also should be noted that nearly every film at Cannes earns an ovation. That type of audience response doesn’t always translate into rapturous reviews.”

Bloomberg:
“When reports first came out in July 2017 that Tarantino’s next project would be a film about the Manson Family, a 1960s cult who went on a killing spree, Weinstein was still involved. Three months later, the New York Times published detailed allegations of Weinstein’s extended history of sexual assault, triggering one of the biggest scandals in Hollywood history, and soon thereafter Tarantino cut ties with his former mentor.

It’s therefore inevitable that Once Upon a Time in Hollywood will be judged in light of Tarantino’s newfound independence. Disappointingly, the director’s first post-Weinstein film is strikingly bland.”