March 24, 2012

The video in the post before this one shows the whole segment that was broadcasted. What a lovely video to watch. Thanks to Hallie we have this great still of the show and the transcript. Thank you! Photocredit to Michael Rozman/Warner Bros.

Talk show host Ellen DeGeneres and Brad Pitt walk through the lower ninth ward in New Orleans and discuss the progress of “Make It Right” airing on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” on Tuesday, March 20th. Brad on New Orleans and “Make it Right”

Ellen: Let me start from the beginning. Lets start from when you first fell in love with New Orleans. Where were you? What year?

Brad: Early 90’s and it was a bit of a blur because New Orleans will do that to you.

Ellen: I don’t remember last night.

Brad: Yeah I understand. I fell in love with the place. The people. The music. It’s in the air. It’s something you can’t describe on camera.

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• x001 March 20 – The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

February 9, 2012

Brad Pitt recently spoke with Variety’s Christy Grosz about his work on two best picture Oscar nominees, “Moneyball” and “The Tree of Life,” and collaborating with one of the most reclusive directors in the business.

How did Terrence Malick convey his concepts for “Tree of Life” to you as an actor?

He would come in with three pages of single-spaced thoughts and maybe some dialogue. What he does is he gets up in the morning and just bangs on the typewriter for an hour, ideas for the day’s work. I learned as an actor to pick a few things from that consciousness notebook that he would give me, and I would start to build something around that.

He starts with a very dense script but (uses) that as a spring board to capture those truthful missteps. He would do stuff like push Chivo (cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki) before a shot just to put him off balance. We were in the car doing what I thought was a very important scene and all of a sudden he threw the dog in the front seat to create this chaos.

How did that work with the young actors?
I know the dialogue, at least as it is written, and Jessica (Chastain) knows the dialogue, but the boys don’t. He may tell them right before a scene, give them a response to aim for, but it’s very free form.

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January 31, 2012

We sit in silent “Fiji” water in the Gulf of Mexico. Swim out and waving his children: “There is nothing that changes your life more than being a father. It’s such a wonderful change your life perspectives. Everything is relative. I would never trade youth for wisdom that I learn every day and go for it!”

He is considering a 50 step down from the canvas: “I want to realize many important projects.”

BILD: You have gray hair. Fear of old age?
“Grey I’m already long, I’m afraid of dying, but not before getting old.”

You can lead a normal life?
He laughs and itches his chin. “What is normal? You have to enjoy it. In New Orleans we can walk. I love the variety of noises and there to open a window and the feeling to hear the music. And to drink a beer on the balcony.”

They love Europe?
“Yes. Our fortress is our castle in France. Since we have our own protected world. A little paradise.”

Read more. Thanks Gabriella. Translation credit to Hefi!


• x02 Bild (12).

January 25, 2012

The superstar with multiple Oscar nominations has everything: a brilliant career, a partner he wants to marry and, in “Moneyball,” a seeming disaster he turned into a masterpiece. Still, Hollywood’s producer-actor confesses to earlier bouts of depression and a relentless need to question just about everything (himself included): “This idea of perpetual happiness is crazy and overrated.”

Try to set up an interview with Brad Pitt, and you instantly plunge into his almost Dada-esque world.

After all, where do you go? A restaurant rendez­vous would devolve into a scrum of gawkers and gapers; his suggestion that we meet at this reporter’s office creates such a stir among jaded journalists, it is rapidly nixed; and Pitt’s house in the Hollywood Hills is apparently out of bounds, reserved for his partner, Angelina Jolie, and their six kids — and those inquiring minds eager to know about a decapitated head found nearby only days before.

So it is, like participants in the witness protection program, that we find ourselves ensconced in a 14th-floor suite at Hollywood’s W Hotel this Jan. 20 — chosen because Pitt’s Cadillac Escalade can make a quick in-and-out to avoid the paparazzi thirsting to behold him.

Pitt doesn’t blame them. Media reports surfaced hours earlier that police had interviewed his bodyguard about human limbs scattered near the Hollywood sign. Still, he can’t help being bemused. “I was watching CNN, and they said, ‘Brad Pitt’s home!’ and, ‘Brad Pitt’s bodyguard!’ “ he laughs in disbelief. “I’m like: ‘Why? Why?’ “

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• x008 The Hollywood Reporter (Outtakes).

And the ‘behind the scenes’ of the cover photoshoot:

January 4, 2012
by admin / BP Press

If one facet of Brad Pitt could be considered obscure, it might be — oddly enough — his acting career.

For much of his two decades in the spotlight — since his breakthrough as a sweet-talking grifter in Thelma and Louise (1991) and even more so since Mr. and Mrs. Smith (2005) — Pitt has been a star first and an actor second. His every move — often with a hard-to-miss entourage that includes his partner, Angelina Jolie, and their six children — provides endless fodder for the tabloids.

But the Brad Pitt on-screen remains elusive.

The contradiction can be summed up like this: Pitt is a superstar who also happens to be a wild card. He has steered clear of action franchises and romantic comedies. Although he hasn’t shied from big roles — they don’t come much bigger than Achilles (Troy) or Death (Meet Joe Black) — he has often sought the cover and camaraderie of ensembles, as in the Ocean’s movies and Inglourious Basterds (which are among his highest-grossing hits).

People seldom talk about his range, but he’s equally capable of flamboyance (12 Monkeys) and restraint (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button). And some of his most intriguing films (Fight Club, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford) are self-referential comments on his obvious magnetism.

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January 4, 2012
by admin / BP Press

Like a mid-season coaching hire for a losing ballclub, director Bennett Miller inherited an uphill battle when he was brought in as the director of a shaky project called “Moneyball,” but he had two key players on his side — and both of them were named Brad Pitt.

With its half-dozen Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild nominations, “Moneyball” is now viewed as a quality contender in the Oscar nomination race, but the sports-film-with-a-message was clearly a longshot project back when Miller stepped in following the summer 2009 departure of Steven Soderbergh, who had spent years developing the script.

The difference maker, says Bennett, was the persistent presence of star and producer Pitt, who was an MVP on both sides of the camera.

“You work all day with Brad the actor and there’s that energy, and then we’d wrap at the end of the day and maybe half an hour later we’d get together in this little area outside his trailer and he’d be Brad the producer,” Miller said. “We would look at the next day, just go over things and maybe have a glass of wine. Sometimes it would be two or three hours of discussing and planning, and it’s pretty exhausting making a movie, but it became this ritual for us. And then early the next morning, Brad the actor is back, being on set and making things happen in a totally different way.”

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